Poetry Friday: A Mother-To-Be by Edith Rowe Wood

My mother’s mother was a poet. I like to think I inherited my poet’s ear from her. We called her Nano. She was precious. She taught Sunday school for years and years—up into old age. When my sisters and I visited Nano we would attend her class on Sunday morning. My clearest memory is of flannel board lessons. I loved listening to her tell the Bible stories as she placed the colorful setting and characters on the flannel board. She touched many lives with her gentle, loving spirit.

Nano pic

Today I bring you one of her poems. It’s perfect for Mother’s Day.

Nano-Mother to beJama Rattigan is hosting Poetry Friday today at Jama’s Alphabet Soup. Her post is a beautiful and touching.

 

24 thoughts on “Poetry Friday: A Mother-To-Be by Edith Rowe Wood

  1. How lovely! And I can just say I was doing some math and your scheduled for a book baby in not-that-much over a year. It will be here before you know it. (Make sure you get lots of sleep now…you know how newborn baby books are)

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  2. Penny, This was precious. I just got home from a Mother’s Day treat with my daughters and Mom at the Paramount. When I turned on my computer, there was your Nano’s poem…beautifully written and heartfelt. So were your sweet words of your memories of her and flannel board Bible stories. I enjoy technology but there was magic in those pictures that would stick to the flannel board. Thanks for a treasured walk down Memory Lane.

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  3. Love this post – the story behind it and the lovely poem to the mother-to-be. Your Nano’s depth and warmth come out in her poem. I love its elegant language.

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  4. This is lovely, Penny. I have a colleague who is a mother-to-be, & will share it with her. I imagine you did receive those poetic ‘genes’! I called one of my grandmothers “Nano” too-love hearing that you did.

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  5. Thanks so much for sharing this poem, Penny! Literary talent definitely runs in your family.

    I also loved flannel board stories — I like imagining you and your sisters listening to your grandmother’s stories on Sunday mornings.

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  6. Penny–thank you so much for sharing this lovely, heart-felt poem and your memories. Thank you also for reminding me of felt-board stories. I absolutely loved them when I was a kid. I’d hate to think they’ve been replaced by screens. They were so tactile and the fact that they stuck was magic!

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  7. Penny – this is indeed a beautiful poem. What an absolute gift to share with us – And that you inherited from her 🙂

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